2 Reasons OSX Mavericks Matter to Educators

Apple last week launched OSX Mavericks, the free and latest version of its desktop operating system. Notably, the tech giant ditched its cat-based naming scheme in favor of one themed after California locations (Mavericks is a well-known surfing spot in Northern California). That’s all fine and good, but what about the new features? More specifically, what does Mavericks bring to education?

It turns out that there are two big features of particular note to educators.

  • iWork and iLife are now free
  • iBooks for iOS and for Macs

Rick W. Burkett runs the John A. Logan College Teaching and Learning Center, teaches history, and heads an educational nonprofit. He publishes blogs on a wide variety of topics, including history, teaching and learning, student success, and teaching online.

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Apple To Give Away OS X and iWorks to Mac Users

From Yahoo News:

Apple revealed the surprise offer, available to all users of MacBooks and Mac computers, on Tuesday at the same time as it unveiled a slimmer, faster iPad Air and a new line-up of Macs in time for the holidays.

Its Mac operating system and iWork software suite, which compete with Microsoft’s Excel, Word and other applications, will now be offered free to all users.

By giving away its Mac operating system Apple is taking on Microsoft’s predominant Windows platform, installed on an estimated eight to nine out of 10 of the world’s computers and one of its most profitable cash cows.

“We are turning the industry on its ear, but this is not why we’re doing it,” Apple Chief Executive Tim Cook told media and technology executives at San Francisco’s Yerba Buena Center.

“We want our customers to have our latest software.”

Full post here.

Rick W. Burkett runs the John A. Logan College Teaching and Learning Center, teaches history, and heads an educational nonprofit. He publishes blogs on a wide variety of topics, including history, teaching and learning, student success, and teaching online.

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Apple sees chance to compete with Office on the Web

by Gregg Keizer @ computerworld.com

Almost as an afterthought, Apple on Monday announced it was working on browser-based versions of its iWork productivity applications, a move one analyst said challenged Microsoft’s Office behemoth.

For a few minutes during Monday’s keynote of Apple’s Worldwide Developers Conference, Roger Rosner, who heads iWork development, spun through a quick demonstration of iWork for iCloud, a second attempt by Apple to move its Pages word processor, Numbers spreadsheet and Keynote presentation maker into the Internet age.

That first attempt, dubbed iWork.com, ended miserably last July, more than three years after its launch, when Apple pulled the plug. iWork.com was intended to complement the locally installed suite by the same name, but offered no Web-based document creation or editing, and instead made do with document viewing, downloading and commenting.

iWork for iCloud, on the other hand, is to be a full-featured trio of applications that run in a browser on either OS X or Windows, and allow document creation and editing on all of a user’s devices. They are, essentially, Pages, Numbers and Keynote ported to the Web.

Full post here.

Rick W. Burkett runs the John A. Logan College Teaching and Learning Center, teaches history, and heads an educational nonprofit. He publishes blogs on a wide variety of topics, including history, teaching and learning, student success, and teaching online.

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