LinkedIn Privacy: 5 Safety Tips

LinkedIn Privacy: 5 Safety Tips (via InformationWeek)

Protect your LinkedIn account by browsing securely, keeping your activity private, and recognizing signs of malicious behavior. Earlier this month, LinkedIn killed a controversial feature called “Intro,” which embedded LinkedIn profiles into emails…

Continue reading

Facebook: 25,000 Government Requests for Information About Users

Facebook Logo

Facebook released its first Global Government Requests Report yesterday, which reported government requests for information for the first 6 months of 2013.  The US government made between 11,000 and 12,000 requests of the more than 25,000 total requests.  Facebook did not respond to all requests, saying it only replied to 79% of inquires in the United States.

Facebook Security Issues

Facebook Logo

Recent reports of security issues at Facebook once again have brought Facebook into the cross-hairs of security experts.  Here are some links to Facebook pages–and other posts about Facebook security–that can help you protect your information.

Here are some posts to Facebook’s Security Pages:

Facebook Security Page

Facebook Help > Security

Here are some posts that can help you to secure your Facebook account:

5 ways to secure your Facebook profile in a post-Timeline world

Sophos – Facebook Security Best Practices

CNET – Five-minute Facebook security checkup

TechCrunch – Facebook Asks Every User For A Verified Phone Number To Prevent Security Disaster

Computerworld – 5 ways to secure your Facebook profile in a post-Timeline world

LifeHacker – How to Keep Your Facebook Secure (by Enabling HTTPS)

 NBC News – Facebook security hole to blame for spam attack

 QuickOnlineTips – 5 Quick Tips to Secure Facebook

 

NYT: Facebook Cancels Shortcut Over Concern for Security

The New York Times is reporting that Facebook has discontinued its auto login feature after finding it could expose a user’s email address or even allow access to their account.  The website Hacker News reports that 1 million Facebook accounts had been affected by this. TrendMicro says that the address shortcuts were “inherently dangerous.”

The New York Times post is here.